ANALYSIS OF INTERMODAL TERMINAL HIGHWAY ACCESS TO ECONOMIC ACTIVITY CENTERS

An area of increasing concern to policy makers is the relationship among intermodal service, terminal location, and the surrounding highway network. Closely tied to these is the need for a better understanding of their impact on the relative costs of intermodal versus single-mode freight movements. To gain insight into this, the authors undertook a series of structured interviews with providers of intermodal services and incorporated the information provided into a simple cost model. The model allows the analyst to examine the boundary conditions between intermodal and highway shipments and to explore how costs affect factors such as terminal location, access difficulty, and shipper distribution about the terminal. Using the model, three cases were evaluated: (A) variations in customer location, (B) variations in the type of customer pickup and delivery, and (C) changes in terminal efficiency. Cost data were obtained through the shipper surveys; information on catchment areas gathered through a study of the I-95 corridor along the eastern seaboard between the mid-Atlantic states, Jacksonville, Florida, and Atlanta, Georgia; and other sources. In all cases, it became apparent that the drayage and terminal inefficiencies that can be readily absorbed in long-haul moves--1500 to 2000 km (900 to 1200 mi)--cannot be absorbed in the short-haul markets that were studied. Results also identified the importance of the proximity of an intermodal terminal to a shipper. Terminal congestion was found to be a factor in short-haul markets, in which lengthy delays can eliminate the cost benefits of intermodal movement of freight.

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Features: References; Tables;
  • Pagination: p. 43-52
  • Monograph Title: INTERMODAL FREIGHT TERMINAL OF THE FUTURE
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00723841
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS, TRB
  • Created Date: Jul 23 1996 12:00AM