OBSTACLES TO PORT OPERATION AND DEVELOPMENT: DREDGING AND OTHER ENVIRONMENTAL CONSTRAINTS

Steps must be taken to prevent environmental protection laws from choking U.S. ports and crippling the nation's capacity to engage in maritime commerce. It would be catastrophic if the United States were unable to capitalize on the liberalization of international trade because of well-intentioned environmental regulations that not only are allowing the nation's navigable channels to be filled with silt but also are draining limited development funds. Legislative action is urgently required to ensure a balanced administration of U.S. environmental laws. The severity of the crisis facing U.S. ports is familiar to anyone involved in any aspect of the industry, from port administrators and dock workers to shipping line managers. A poll conducted by the American Association of Port Authorities indicates that as port planners and administrators look to the next century, they are most concerned with "coming up with the money to pay for facility development, dealing with environmental regulations and getting timely dredging approvals". These concerns are interrelated with the costs of meeting environmental regulations placing increasing demands on port budgets. This paper examines a number of the most severe regulatory constraints in practice, discusses the status of recent reform proposals, and suggests some reforms in existing practice and law.

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Pagination: p. 31-42
  • Monograph Title: INTERMODAL FREIGHT TERMINAL OF THE FUTURE
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00723840
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS, TRB
  • Created Date: Jul 23 1996 12:00AM