THE NATURE OF AND REASONS FOR THE DECLINE IN DRINKING AND DRIVING IN THE UNITED STATES: AN UPDATE

In general, neither the amount of change in drinking or in driving per se, nor the fluctuating economic conditions appear to account for the very large (33 percent) reduction observed in alcohol-related fatalities over the last decade. Safety improvements in vehicles and roadways have apparently reduced the risk per mile driven, as evidenced by a decline in the deaths per hundred million vehicle miles from 2.8 in 1982 to 1.8 in 1992. The greater decline in alcohol-related fatalities cannot be explained on the basis of such improvements. To what can decreases in alcohol-related fatalities be attributed? It is likely that the factors contributing to the change are complex and interconnected and the proportion of change attributable to each cannot be determined. Three factors that appear to have contributed to the decline are discussed here. They include: (1) deterrence strategies, primarily related to traffic safety policies and legislation; (2) raising of the drinking age to 21; and (3) increased public awareness and activism.

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Features: Figures; References;
  • Pagination: p. 1-12
  • Serial:
    • VTI Conferens
    • Publisher: Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute (VTI)
    • ISSN: 0347-6049

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00723279
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Report/Paper Numbers: No. 4A, Part 3
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Jul 17 1996 12:00AM