MATERIALLY AFFECTING DURABILITY

This article examines the complicated and controversial issue of concrete durability. To specify and design a concrete structure for durability, assumptions must be made about its severity of exposure to harmful substances, and about the likely variability in performance of the concrete itself. Current codes and standards for reinforcement corrosion fail to acknowledge the different levels of resistance that may be achieved with different cement types and admixtures. Specification is still based only on a combination of concrete grade (defined by strength, cement content, and water/cement ratio) and cover. This approach is unacceptable, because corrosion of reinforcement continues to be the single largest cause of deterioration of reinforced concrete structures. A detailed study of published data suggests that Portland cement concretes made today, even when conforming to current standards, have much less resistance to chloride attack than those made 50 years ago. The author indicates some of the many options available for improved concrete. For example, many studies have shown that blended cements have much more resistance to chloride ingress, when they use Portland cement in combination with pulverised-fuel ash (pfa) or ground granulated blastfurnace slag (ggbs).

  • Availability:
  • Corporate Authors:

    THE CONCRETE SOCIETY

    112 WINDSOR ROAD
    SLOUGH, BERKSHIRE  United Kingdom  SL1 2JA
  • Authors:
    • BAMFORTH, P
  • Publication Date: 1996

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Pagination: p. 21-2
  • Serial:
    • CONCRETE
    • Volume: 30
    • Issue Number: 1
    • Publisher: THE CONCRETE SOCIETY
    • ISSN: 0010-5317

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00723179
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Transport Research Laboratory
  • Files: ITRD
  • Created Date: Jul 26 1996 12:00AM