CONCENTRATIONS OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN THE PASSENGER COMPARTMENTS OF AUTOMOBILES

In-vehicle concentrations of selected gasoline-derived volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and formaldehyde were examined on 113 commutes through suburban New Jersey and 33 New Jersey/New York commutes. Overall median concentrations were lowest in a typical suburban commute, slightly higher on the New Jersey Turnpike, and highest in transit through the Lincoln Tunnel. Median in-vehicle concentrations of benzene, ethylbenzene, m&p-xylene, and o-xylene were 14, 6.8, 36, and 15 micro g/cu.m respectively. One vehicle, with a carburetted engine, developed malfunctions that caused gasoline emissions within the engine compartment during driving, resulting in the gasoline-derived VOC concentrations in this vehicle being much higher than in the properly maintained fuel-injected vehicle, particularly for the low ventilation extreme. The highest in-vehicle benzene concentration measured during these malfunctions was 45.2 micro g/cu.m. The air concentration in the vehicle driven in tandem was a factor of 25 less (1.8 micro g/cu.m).

  • Availability:
  • Corporate Authors:

    American Chemical Society

    1155 16th Street, NW
    Washington, DC  United States  20036
  • Authors:
    • LAWRYK, N J
    • Weisel, C P
  • Publication Date: 1996-3

Language

  • English

Media Info

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00723139
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Transport Research Laboratory
  • Files: ITRD
  • Created Date: Jul 26 1996 12:00AM