LANDSLIDES: INVESTIGATION AND MITIGATION. CHAPTER 22 - HYDRAULIC TAILINGS

Tailings, defined as sand-, silt-, or clay-sized solid wastes from mineral-processing operations that were originally produced, handled, and deposited in slurry form, represent a special case of slope stability in that they are artificially constructed deposits of manufactured soil. Tailings are often identified by their association with mining and milling operations. Where encountered along transportation routes, tailings deposits may affect the stability or safety of these facilities by (a) causing instability of excavated cuts, (b) creating potential landslide hazards from adjacent deposits, (c) increasing subgrade compressibility and settlement, and (d) possessing adverse environmental characteristics (high erodibility, heavy-metal pollution, and acid drainage). This chapter examines the characteristics and properties of tailings, slope stability and environmental issues related to tailings deposits, the failure of tailings impoundments, and mitigation measures.

  • Record URL:
  • Availability:
  • Supplemental Notes:
    • Special Report 247 is also available in hardcover (ISBN 0-309-06151-2). Distribution, posting, or copying of this PDF is strictly prohibited without written permission of the Transportation Research Board of the National Academy of Sciences. Unless otherwise indicated, all materials in this PDF are copyrighted by the National Academy of Sciences. Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
  • Authors:
    • Vick, Steven G
  • Publication Date: 1996

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Media Type: Digital/other
  • Features: Figures; Photos; References;
  • Pagination: pp 577-584
  • Monograph Title: LANDSLIDES: INVESTIGATION AND MITIGATION
  • Serial:
  • Publication flags:

    Open Access (libre)

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00722511
  • Record Type: Publication
  • ISBN: 030906208X
  • Files: TRIS, TRB, ATRI
  • Created Date: Jun 6 1996 12:00AM