TRAVEL FOR FOOD SHOPPING: THE NEW DOCTRINE AND SOME ALTERNATIVES

This paper reports specifically on an investigation of food retailing. It argues controversially that locational change is unlikely to result in significant traffic reductions, and that a recent recommendation for promoting this change, namely by providing greater town centre parking capacity for shoppers at the expense of commuters, could have severe deleterious effects. These conclusions are derived from a detailed analysis of how far people travel for food shopping, how frequently they shop, what mode of transport they travel by, and whether they combine food shopping with other activities. This aims to provide an understanding of the overall traffic impacts of different sites. This paper will also outline some preliminary investigation into different ways of organising food shopping which might complement locational policies, or perhaps provide better alternatives. The possibilities offered by both delivery systems and neighbourhood shops are explored, using case study examples, in an attempt to analyse how policy could be made more sustainable in the long term. (A) For the covering abstract see IRRD 877018.

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Features: References;
  • Pagination: p. 183-95

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00722319
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Transport Research Laboratory
  • ISBN: 0-86050-282-1
  • Files: ITRD
  • Created Date: Jun 28 1996 12:00AM