COASTAL BLUFF RESTORED TO ORIGINAL BEAUTY FOLLOWING A DEVASTATING, 44-TON LANDSLIDE

Following heavy winter rains in 1993, a catastrophic landslide sent 44,000 tons of earth and debris, including five bluff-top homes, tumbling down a California hillside. It buried a major highway and a railroad track under 40 feet of rubble near the coastal city of Dana Point. After the debris had settled, it was evident that immediate and aesthetically-pleasing repair of the collapsed bluff was necessary to protect the economic health of the coastal resort community and to restore the highway that was a primary evacuation route for a nearby nuclear plant. This article explains the process of rebuilding the bluff, hammering giant "nails" into the soil for strength, and using texturized "bluffscape" designed to look like natural bluff face. This project won recognition for a Public Works Project of the Year.

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Features: Photos;
  • Pagination: p. 4-5
  • Serial:
    • APWA Reporter
    • Volume: 63
    • Issue Number: 4
    • Publisher: American Public Works Association
    • ISSN: 0092-4873

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00721231
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: May 21 1996 12:00AM