URBAN ACTIVITY PATTERNS AND MODAL SPLIT IN THE JOURNEY TO WORK

Relationships between modal split for the journey to work and patterns of social and economic activity in large urban areas are investigated in this paper. Small zone data from six major land-use transportation studies were used as a basis for a systematic comparative analysis of these relationships. Three of the studies were British - London, West Midlands and Selnec - and three American - Tri-State, Penn-Jersey and Los Angeles. Standard correlation and regression programmes were employed on a wide range of data, using three distinct approaches. Our first models were based on all trip origins and destinations for each zone, while the second set analyzed the major inter-zonal traffic flows. A third group of models assigning all trips to a shortest route network and investigating the modal split along each link was attempted, though not fully explored due to computer limitations. The results reveal the overriding influence of car-ownership on modal split, but also demonstrate the limitations imposed by urban structure in the form of employment and population densities. (a) /TRRl/

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  • Corporate Authors:

    Reading University, England

    Whiteknights
    Reading RG6 2AB, Berkshire,   England 
  • Authors:
    • Sammons, R
    • Hall, P
  • Publication Date: 1974-11

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Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00137670
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Transport and Road Research Laboratory (TRRL)
  • Report/Paper Numbers: Paper No. 32 Monograph
  • Files: ITRD, TRIS
  • Created Date: Nov 9 1981 12:00AM