LONG DISTANCE COMMUTING AND ROLE OF ALTERNATIVE MODES TO MITIGATE TRAFFIC CONGESTION. THE TENNESSEE EXPERIENCE

This study has integrated two interrelated trends in commuter patterns; the continual growth of long distance commuting defined as one-way trips in excess of 35 miles and congestion at suburban activity centers. Both trends are related to suburbanization; the increased growth of population and employment in metropolitan areas at the fringe of the urban core counties and in outlying suburban counties of the SMSA. A review of intercounty commuter flows in 1980 and 1990 indicates that approximately 3 percent of the work force in Tennessee is involved in a long distance commute. These long distance trips represent 15 percent of the daily person-miles of commuter travel. Vanpooling is well established in the Knoxville area, with more than 42 vanpools in the Knoxville Commuter Pool database. Operation Greenlight was able to expand the number of operators by providing agency lease vans for new vanpool starts. The 25 vanpool drivers responding to the survey had an average vanpool driving experience of 8.7 years. Significantly, 20 percent of the drivers had been driving for less than two years, which suggests that vanpooling is able to attract new vanpool drivers. Once established, vanpools can remain in operation for a long time; 10 of the 25 vanpools had been operating for over 10 years and one had been operating for over 20 years. The study showed mobility options such as vanpooling serve as critical linkages in tying together small rural communities with suburban activity centers where job opportunities are increasingly available. An important ingredient in retaining the economic vitality of many rural communities is the provision of low-cost, reliable, attractive transportation services to neighboring urban centers and suburban activity centers. Also, programs such as Operation Greenlight can rely on vanpooling to enhance access to and within suburban activity centers.

  • Supplemental Notes:
    • Supported by a grant from the U.S. Department of Transportation, University Transportation Centers Program, through Southeastern Transportation Center, Region IV.
  • Corporate Authors:

    Southeastern Transportation Center

    University of Tennessee
    309 Conference Center Building
    Knoxville, TN  United States  37996-4133
  • Authors:
    • Wegmann, F J
    • Ryan, S
  • Publication Date: 1995-10

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Features: Appendices; Figures; Tables;
  • Pagination: 130 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00724691
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Report/Paper Numbers: Final Report
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: May 16 1996 12:00AM