TRUCK AT FAULT LANE CHANGE ACCIDENTS: HOW THEY HAPPEN; WHY THEY HAPPEN

The purpose of this study was to dispel the long held myth that the most dangerous position for a passenger vehicle to travel on the interstate is alongside a semi truck's trailer or near the rear of the tractor's cab on the passenger side. Statistics show that more injury accidents occur when the passenger vehicle travels in the lane to the right of the semi truck about one car length forward of the front bumper of the truck. The trucker's blind spot actually extends from 11 ft (3.4 m) behind to 12 ft 6 in. (3.8 m) forward of the semi truck's front bumper [a total of 23 ft 6 in. (7.2 m)]. When a passenger car traveling straight is struck on the left rear side by a semi truck switching lanes to the right, the front of the car immediately spins to the left, going sideways in front of the truck and is then struck a second time. Two factors contribute to the severity of this accident: (1) the driver of the car, usually, would not be paying attention to a truck one lane over and behind and hence, there would be no anticipation of an impending accident; and (2) there in no time to react (due to a larger mass striking a smaller mass).

  • Corporate Authors:

    Motor Carrier Safety Services, Incorporated

    P.O. Box 10673
    Gladstone, MO  United States  64118
  • Publication Date: 1995-2

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Features: Figures; Photos; Tables;
  • Pagination: 12 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00723833
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Jul 22 1996 12:00AM