ACCIDENT PRONENESS & ACCIDENT PREVENTION. A PHYSIOLOGICAL ENQUIRY INTO ROAD SAFETY

South Africa is shown to have one of the highest road death rates in the world, in spite of the fact that 2/3rds or more of the population do not drive cars. Statistics for 1973 indicate that road deaths annually per 100 000 population are 28.8 for South Africa as against 24.1 for Australia, 21.2 for Canada, 20.0 for USA and 12.3 for Great Britain. The author presents evidence to show that the contribution of accident proneness to the accident rate situation is negligible, and suggests that not only is accident proneness a rather elusive entity but that it is also not a lasting characteristic in any one individual. The application of human factor engineering is discussed as being of greater impact in the reduction of accidents, and examples quoted as evidence include road resurfacing to eliminate skidding, improved street lighting, roundabouts, by-passes to towns and improved alignment at bends. Driver vision is discussed in some detail, and the author concludes that attention to the limitations of human physiology has led to very effective safety measures in aviation and on the railways. It is suggested that the application of these and similar measures to the road situation could result in a substantial saving of lives, and result in enormous economic benefits to the countries concerned. /TRRL/

  • Availability:
  • Corporate Authors:

    South African Road Safety Council

    NRSC Building, Beatrix Street, Private Bag 147X
    Pretoria 0001,   South Africa 
  • Authors:
    • Koeslag, J H
  • Publication Date: 1975-11-12

Media Info

  • Features: Figures; References;
  • Pagination: p. 20-26
  • Serial:
    • ROBOT
    • Issue Number: 83
    • Publisher: SNELCO-PRO PUBLIC RELATIONS CONSULTANTS
    • ISSN: 0035-7391

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00137504
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Transport and Road Research Laboratory (TRRL)
  • Files: ITRD, TRIS
  • Created Date: Oct 6 1976 12:00AM