PUBLIC ATTITUDES TO TRANSPORT PROBLEMS AND POLICIES. FINDINGS FROM THE BRITISH SOCIAL ATTITUDES SURVEY

This report summarises new findings from the 1994 British Social Attitudes Survey (BSA), and presents simple analyses of the latest measures of attitudes to transport issues, and changes of attitudes that have occurred between 1993 and 1994. People's concerns about transport include: (1) exhaust emissions; (2) urban congestion; (3) motorway congestion; (4) traffic noise; and (5) rural traffic. Concern about motorway congestion rose rapidly between 1993 and 1994. Respondents' support for spending more money on transport was: (1) most for rail services; (2) almost as many for bus services; (3) rather fewer for existing roads; and (4) much fewer for new roads. Spending more on health, pensions, and education, is considered more improtant than spending more on transport, which in turn is considered more important than more military and cultural expenditure. In order of popularity, transport policies are: (1) improving priorities for buses, even if motorists might suffer; (2) buildling motorways to relieve congestion; (3) higher car taxes and restrictions on car use for the environment; and (4) (very unpopular) closing unprofitable rail and bus services. Many people's transport decisions are affected by their fear of crime.

  • Corporate Authors:

    University of Oxford

    Transport Studies Unit, 11 Bevington Road
    Oxford,   United Kingdom  OX2 6NB
  • Authors:
    • Stokes, G
    • TAYLOR, B
  • Publication Date: 1995-11

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Features: References;
  • Pagination: 7 p.
  • Serial:
    • Issue Number: TSU REF: 846

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00722375
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Transport Research Laboratory
  • Files: ITRD
  • Created Date: Jun 28 1996 12:00AM