CALMING THE TRAFFIC - OR THE CAR USER?

This article discusses some of the difficulties in implementing traffic calming in practice, and some questions that it raises about car use. Traffic calming has become accepted by transport experts, highway engineers, and environmentalists. However, there are still problems in finding funds for it, because it can be very expensive; in 1992/93, the average cost of a scheme was 27,000 pounds. In the Highways (Traffic Calming) Regulations of 1993, the Department of Transport (DoT) recognised the need to evolve more sophisticated designs than devices like the simple speed hump. Many different techniques have been developed and are still being explored; some of them are described. Despite the obvious advantages of traffic calming schemes, it is not always easy to introduce them. The main problem is people's attitude to car use, where residents often appeal for reduced car speeds, but resent being asked to apply the same discipline while driving their cars. In July 1995, the DoT published the results of its Bypass Project, which investigated the bypass projects in six English towns. Its report contains much useful discussion of how to involve people in making decisions that affect where and how they can use their cars.

  • Availability:
  • Corporate Authors:

    INSTITUTION OF HIGHWAYS & TRANSPORTATION

    6 ENDSLEIGH STREET
    LONDON,   United Kingdom  WC1H 0DZ
  • Authors:
    • STANSFIELD, K
  • Publication Date: 1995-10

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Features: References;
  • Pagination: p. 10,13-4,17
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00719869
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Transport Research Laboratory
  • Files: ITRD, ATRI
  • Created Date: Apr 26 1996 12:00AM