SAFETY BELT USE LAWS: EVALUATION OF PRIMARY ENFORCEMENT AND OTHER PROVISIONS

As of January 1995, all states except Maine and New Hampshire had laws requiring safety belt use. These laws vary widely in their enforcement options (primary or secondary), scope of coverage (vehicles covered and seats covered), fine levels, and other provisions. In this study, Fatal Accident Reporting System (FARS) data on restraint use among fatally injured motor vehicle occupants from 1983 to 1994 were analyzed for the effects of the laws. Particular attention was given to the effects of different enforcement options on safety belt use. Conclusions pertaining to a larger population than the fatally injured were obtained utilizing the concept of use rate for individuals involved in potentially fatal crashes. The present study appears to be the first comprehensive assessment of the effects of state safety belt use laws based on a national data system. A number of statistical techniques are used to assess the effects of safety belt use laws. The results confirm beyond any doubt that the enactment of a law is associated with increased safety belt use. The results also show that primary enforcement is the most important aspect of a safety belt use law affecting the use rates.

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Pagination: 2 p.
  • Serial:
    • Research Note
    • Publisher: National Center for Statistics and Analysis

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00719391
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration
  • Report/Paper Numbers: HS-041 740
  • Files: HSL, TRIS, ATRI, USDOT
  • Created Date: Mar 7 1996 12:00AM