MOTORCYCLISTS REV UP FOR SAFE DRIVING: STATE PROGRAMS TRAIN DRIVERS TO VEER CLEAR OF CRASHES

The Motorcycle Safety Foundation, a non-profit organization, launched its Beginning Rider Course in 1973. By 1990, more than 87,000 people had completed MSF motorcycle rider training courses. MSF has helped establish and support rider training nationwide. A state motor-vehicle agency or department of transportation usually administers the rider education program, with MSF providing training curriculum materials and technical assistance. To have riders stay alive on the streets is the ultimate objective of MSF's Motorcycle Rider Course. Students learn riding skills and the fundamental principles of operating a motorcycle. The course addresses road situations that pose particular problems to cyclists and warns riders of the impact of alcohol and drugs on riding skills. Instructors are experienced motorcyclists. The average student is about 30 years old and females often make up a third or more of the class. Families often take the class together. Local motorcycle dealers tend to be enthusiastic supporters of local Motorcycle Rider Courses and many provide some financial or product support for the courses. Constant research, development and revision have kept MSF's programs up-to-date. State licensing agencies often recognize the Motorcycle Rider Course. In fact, 18 states waive all or portions of the licensing tests if an applicant has successfully completed training.

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Features: Photos;
  • Pagination: p. 12-15
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00716871
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration
  • Report/Paper Numbers: HS-041 476
  • Files: HSL, TRIS, USDOT
  • Created Date: Feb 27 1996 12:00AM