CRIME ON MARYLAND MASS TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION LIGHT RAIL LINE: MYTH OR REALITY?

In 1992 the Maryland Mass Transit Administration (MTA) introduced a barrier-free light rail system that traveled through a variety of neighborhoods. Many of these neighborhoods are located just outside Baltimore City, but they were isolated and had not experienced the urban crime problems that are part of everyday life in the city. Soon after the Central Light Rail Line (CLRL) became operational, these isolated neighborhoods began to experience an increase in crime. It appeared inevitable that the CLRL would be blamed for the increase in crime, since the CLRL was the only significant change in decades for several of these neighborhoods. The crime situation grew worse, and community residents moved into action. At this point, there was only sketchy and incomplete evidence to support the notion that CLRL was transporting crime to the suburbs, but the public perceived that the crime existed, so for all intents and purposes, the increase in crime did exist. The MTA moved quickly to rescue the CLRL and to convince the public that it was a safe and efficient mode of transportation. The MTA used a variety of techniques to regain the public confidence, including public relations, increased police enforcement, and a creative community outreach program. The MTA restored public confidence, the communities along the CLRL have been supportive, and ridership on the CLRL continues to grow.

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Media Type: Digital/other
  • Pagination: p. 253-256
  • Monograph Title: SEVENTH NATIONAL CONFERENCE ON LIGHT RAIL TRANSIT, BALTIMORE, MARYLAND, NOVEMBER 12-15, 1995. VOLUME 1
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00716785
  • Record Type: Publication
  • ISBN: 0309061520
  • Files: TRIS, TRB
  • Created Date: Jan 30 1996 12:00AM