LIGHT RAIL IN SWITZERLAND: CASE STUDY OF BERN SUBURBAN AREA

Bern, the capital of Switzerland, has only 330,000 inhabitants. It has preserved a comprehensive streetcar and bus network within the historic city. Some suburbs are served by a separate four-line light rail transit (LRT) system, which has been upgraded progressively during the past 30 years and today enjoys a high level of technical and operational success. Thanks to the flexibility of LRT, investments could be concentrated on the sections that needed them most. Special operating concerns were increasing speed and reducing the demand on rolling stock. A new type of car with a partly low floor and enhanced comfort level was introduced in 1993. In the last 10 years, the share of commuter traffic to the city (modal split) improved from 50 to 60%. Popular concern about the environment motivated the issue of cheap season tickets throughout Switzerland. This national policy, coupled with the unbalanced peak and off-peak loading patterns typical of metropolitan transit systems, means that LRT fares do not cover all of its costs. Even so, fares cover 60% of operating costs.

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Media Type: Digital/other
  • Features: Figures; References; Tables;
  • Pagination: p. 66-72
  • Monograph Title: SEVENTH NATIONAL CONFERENCE ON LIGHT RAIL TRANSIT, BALTIMORE, MARYLAND, NOVEMBER 12-15, 1995. VOLUME 1
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00716764
  • Record Type: Publication
  • ISBN: 0309061520
  • Files: TRIS, TRB
  • Created Date: Jan 30 1996 12:00AM