DIRECTING THE EVOLUTION OF URBAN LAND USE TO ACHIEVE IMPROVED TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM PERFORMANCE

This paper investigates the potential for directing the growth of an urban region so that the evolving urban form contributes to high levels of access opportunity with minimum travel requirements. Measures of total travel, accessibility, and spatial equity are defined for use in the evaluation of alternative urban spatial patterns. A computer-aided investigation determines optimum locations within the urban region for expected growth. Repeated application of a technique for assigning small increments of growth results in the definition of a high-performance growth path for a 10- to 20-year period. As a case study, the population and employment growth forecast for 1970 to 1990 for the Puget Sound region in the state of Washington is assigned to subregions. Contrast of the study results with current growth trends reveals that new travel requirements could be reduced by two-thirds, access levels could be improved 4 times, and distributional equity could be improved 3 times. These results are judged to be significant enough to warrant further intensive investigation into the feasibility and desirability of actually trying to achieve an urban form that could produce such dramatic improvements in transportation system performance without further substantial investments in capital-intensive transportation facilities or highly subsidized transportation services.

Media Info

  • Media Type: Print
  • Features: Figures; References;
  • Pagination: pp 61-74
  • Monograph Title: Transportation and land development policy
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00134885
  • Record Type: Publication
  • ISBN: 0309024757
  • Files: TRIS, TRB
  • Created Date: Sep 4 1981 12:00AM