INTEGRATING LAND USE AND TRANSPORTATION PLANNING IN REBUILDING CITY CENTERS: AND EXAMINATION OF CEDAR-RIVERSIDE IN MINNEAPOLIS

Billions of dollars are spent annually rebuilding U.S. cities. Joint planning of land use and transportation systems is essential. Cedar-Riverside, a federally funded "new town in town," is located in Minneapolis, Minnesota, 1 mile (1.6 km) east of the central business district and adjacent to the University of Minnesota. It is 240 acres (136 h sq m) in size and has a planned ultimate development of 34,000 people in 12,500 residential units. Thirteen hundred units have been constructed and are occupied. This paper lists 5 joint planning objectives and comments on how well Cedar-Riverside met them. A thoroughly integrated second-level pedestrian system, an extensive bikeway system, (ties to regional transit) and a university community distribution system are discussed. The joint planning objectives include minimizing the need for travel, providing reasonable alternatives to the use of the automobile, providing sizable "environmental" (traffic-free) areas for redevelopment, reducing amount of travel within the district, and reducing the amount of space consumed by automobile parking. The conclusion is that this project is planned to meet these objectives.

Media Info

  • Media Type: Print
  • Features: Figures; Photos;
  • Pagination: pp 33-46
  • Monograph Title: Transportation and land development policy
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00134882
  • Record Type: Publication
  • ISBN: 0309024757
  • Files: TRIS, TRB
  • Created Date: Sep 4 1976 12:00AM