COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS APPLIED TO BUOYANCY DRIVEN NATURAL VENTILATION OF OFFSHORE STRUCTURES LOCATED IN TEMPERATE REGIONS

Due to its simplicity and low cost, natural ventilation is used as one of the principal ventilation methods onboard offshore structures. This paper shows that the design criteria employed should depend on the location of the platform and the local climate. For platforms in the North Sea, it has been shown that buoyancy effects on ventilation rates, due to heated surfaces inside modules, are comparatively small and should only be considered for the case when wind speeds are less than 0.5m/s. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations were made of the natural ventilation of a process module onboard a platform located in the Adriatic Sea. The results showed that buoyancy driven ventilation due to surfaces heated by solar radiation is significant. Also, due to the energy from solar radiation, the buoyancy driven ventilation is a significant factor for much higher wind speeds than the buoyancy driven ventilation principally due to hot equipment on platforms in the North Sea. The results also indicated that very different flow patterns will be found if buoyancy is considered and simulated even at quite high wind speeds. The latter may have implications for certain aspects of offshore module design. Given the climatic conditions in the Adriatic Sea and its weather statistics, the CFD simulations show that buoyancy driven ventilation should be considered as a primary design parameter and that erroneous designs can be the result if, say, methods developed for the North Sea were applied to platforms in the Adriatic Sea. Finally, it is suggested that CFD simulations should be integrated into the design process for natural ventilated areas.

  • Supplemental Notes:
    • Inst Marine Engrs Trans, v 107 pt 3, 1995, p 167 [18 p, 9 ref, 16 fig]
  • Authors:
    • Nielsen, K L
    • Chiavato, O
  • Publication Date: 1995

Language

  • English

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00717632
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: British Maritime Technology
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Mar 4 1996 12:00AM