CAN COMPUTER-DIRECTED POLICE CUT ACCIDENTS?

Traffic police in West Sussex will soon be deployed by computer instruction from a system called project 2001 whereby data from road sensors will be passed to miniprocessors modelling traffic parameters and police action. Research at the transport and Road Research Laboratory has shown that 2000 conflicts occur for each accident, and although the conflicts cannot be detected electronically they are related to measurable parameters such as vehicle lengths, gaps, speeds and flows. It has been shown that police presence modifies drivers speed, close following of the vehicle in front and gap acceptance. Radar speed checks at regular intervals at the same place were also shown to keep speed down. It is hoped that by continous monitoring of traffic conditions it will be possible to direct police action more effectively thus reducing the number of conflicts cutting accidents by some five per cent. /TRRL/

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  • Corporate Authors:

    IPC Magazines

    66-69 Great Queens Street
    London WC2E 5DD,   England 
  • Publication Date: 1975-11-27

Media Info

  • Pagination: p. 529
  • Serial:
    • NEW SCIENTIST
    • Volume: 68
    • Issue Number: 977
    • Publisher: REED BUSINESS INFORMATION LTD
    • ISSN: 0262-4079

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00134242
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Transport and Road Research Laboratory (TRRL)
  • Files: ITRD, TRIS
  • Created Date: Sep 4 1976 12:00AM