EFFECT OF ASPHALT MIXTURE CHARACTERISTICS AND DESIGN ON FRICTIONAL RESISTANCE OF BITUMINOUS WEARING COURSE MIXTURES

Investigations of 13 field test sections indicated that the key to preventing frictional resistance problems early in the life of dense-graded surface course mixtures is to maintain field air-void contents above 3.4% for 12.5-mm (1/2-in.) maximum aggregate size (ID-2) mixtures and 3.0% for 25.4-mm (1-in.) maximum aggregate size (ID-3) mixtures. Some existing mixture design and acceptance procedures, as well as existing field control and acceptance procedures, were determined to be primary contributors to the design and acceptance of mixtures which are likely to have low air-void contents and low frictional resistance. A procedure was developed and recommended to determine optimum asphalt content and to screen mixture designs that may be particularly sensitive to changes in asphalt content. A Texas gyratory compactor, modified to simulate the new Strategic Highway Research Program gyratory compactor, was found to do a better job than Marshall compaction of producing laboratory mixtures more representative of the field. However, additional studies are clearly needed to identify and validate the best laboratory compaction method. It was determined that one of the key factors in controlling frictional resistance problems is the control of air-void contents of laboratory-compacted plant-produced mixtures. More accurate determination of maximum specific gravities in the field would help in controlling air-void contents more accurately during construction.

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Features: Figures; References; Tables;
  • Pagination: p. 39-50
  • Monograph Title: Seal coats and asphalt recycling
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00715578
  • Record Type: Publication
  • ISBN: 0309062012
  • Files: TRIS, TRB
  • Created Date: Jan 5 1996 12:00AM