SOCIAL INFLUENCES ON ADOLESCENT DRIVING UNDER THE INFLUENCE IN A SAMPLE OF HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS

The correlates of driving under the influence (DUI) of alcohol or other drugs were examined in a sample of 2,037 tenth and twelfth grade students in a large midwestern city. Thirteen percent reported that they had driven under the influence in the last month and 31 percent reported having been a passenger with someone who was DUI in the last month. Males were slightly more likely than females to drive under the influence and females were more likely than males to be with drinking drivers. Demographic, personality, and social variables were related to DUI behavior and exposure to DUI by others. Results suggest that programs targeted at correcting beliefs about the positive consequences of alcohol use, changing norms in relation to drinking and driving and alcohol use, and teaching skills to refuse and intervene when exposed to drinking drivers may prevent DUI behavior. Preliminary results of the effects of a social influences drug prevention program on self-reports of DUI behavior and traffic casualty statistics are described.

Language

  • English

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Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00714621
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS, ATRI
  • Created Date: Dec 12 1995 12:00AM