YOUNG DRIVERS AND ACCIDENT RISK

This paper describes a full investigation, by the Road Safety Unit of Birmingham City Council, of the level of attitude change brought by a traditional type of pre-driver education course. The participants in the study were 149 secondary school students from the West Midlands region of England. Each student was aged 16 or 17, and none had passed a driving test. Each was asked to complete a questionnaire, testing for: (1) demographic factors; (2) experience of driving; and (3) perception of driving. The school-based education programme consisted of hour-long talks given by: (1) a driving instructor; (2) a road safety officer; and (3) a police officer. After the talks, each student was again given the questions about perception of driving, so that his/her change of attitude could be assessed. Some of the responses caused concern, although the study had several methodological limitations. The study's results showed that the programme was probably unsuccessful in achieving its aims. They appeared to confirm the feeling that traditional short pre-driver education courses have little beneficial effect on the attitudes of new and especially young drivers. The Unit realises that this problem still needs to be addressed.

  • Corporate Authors:

    INSTITUTE OF ROAD SAFETY OFFICERS

    SNABE COTTAGE
    DRUMCLOG, STRATHAVEN,   United Kingdom  ML10 6QF
  • Authors:
    • HAIGNEY, D
    • HICKEY, T D
  • Publication Date: 1995-4

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Features: References;
  • Pagination: p. 17,19,21,23,25,27
  • Serial:
    • INROADS
    • Volume: 16
    • Issue Number: 4
    • Publisher: INSTITUTE OF ROAD SAFETY OFFICERS

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00714470
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Transport Research Laboratory
  • Files: ITRD
  • Created Date: Dec 27 1995 12:00AM