ANALYSIS OF STATE DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SAFETY EXPENDITURES AND HIGHWAY SAFETY

A review of the FHWA annual "Highway Statistics" report indicates that variations in motor vehicle traffic fatality and injury rates, as well as safety and administrative expenditures, are quite significant among the state departments of transportation (SDOTs), even for those in states with similar regional, physical size, population, and other socioeconomic characteristics. The extent of the causal relationships that may exist between highway fatality or injury rates and SDOT upper-management structures, percent budgetary allocations, traffic variables, and network pavement conditions is examined and evaluated. The statistical test of significance and variance component analysis were used to quantify the magnitudes of these relationships. The findings indicated that (a) the states with the lowest highway fatality rates suffered from the highest injury rates and vice versa, (b) increases in the annual average daily traffic per km and in expenditures on safety were both significantly associated with reductions in fatality rates, and (c) no common pattern could be found among the SDOTs in the allocation of budgetary funds between the competing activities of safety and administration. Areas for further research are recommended.

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Features: Figures; References; Tables;
  • Pagination: p. 148-154
  • Monograph Title: Human performance and safety in highway, traffic, and ITS systems
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00713547
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS, TRB, ATRI
  • Created Date: Nov 13 1995 12:00AM