CONTROL OF THE START OF COMBUSTION IN A DIRECT INJECTION DIESEL ENGINE USING AN OPTICAL SENSOR

Results are presented on the effects of controlling the start of combustion on direct-injection diesel engine exhaust emissions for various engine operating conditions. A Nippondenso optical combustion sensor was applied to the engine, to control the start of its combustion. The sensor was installed in the engine's first cylinder, so that it had the widest possible view of the piston combustion bowl. A pressure transducer was used to detect the start of the combustion. Some results were obtained for the ignition delays, obtained from the optical and pressure signals. Steady state tests, including tests of the effects of exhaust gas recirculation, and transient tests, were conducted on the turbocharged engine. Several tests were performed, using two fuels of different cetane numbers: (1) UK diesel fuel; and (2) a lower quality fuel, with substantially higher aromatic content and thus much lower cetane number. It was found that: (1) the optical combustion sensor tested could be used to determine reliably the start of combustion over a wide range of engine operating conditions; (2) start-of-combustion timing is not the only parameter controlling diesel emissions; and (3) the two fuels tested had significantly different effects. For the covering abstract see IRRD 873243.

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Features: References;
  • Pagination: p. 183-96

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00713393
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Transport Research Laboratory
  • ISBN: 0-85298-847-8
  • Files: ITRD
  • Created Date: Nov 22 1995 12:00AM