THE EFFECTS OF COMBUSTION CHAMBER DESIGN ON EXHAUST EMISSIONS FROM SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES

This paper describes a new family of combustion chambers, designed to reduce the exhaust emissions of spark-emission engines and increase their thermal efficiency; it also presents some results of experimental tests. The aim was to develop a 'fast lean-burn' combustion system, which would enable emission regulations to be met without the use of equipment for cleaning exhaust gases. A new type of combustion chamber was developed, then tested over a wide range of air-fuel ratios under full-load operating conditions. The fuel used was natural gas, which is low-burning compared to petrol, and thus especially useful for testing fast-burn chambers. The design investigated here is based on the principle of using squish motion, to generate a series of jets aimed at the chamber's centre just before ignition. The test engine was a Ricardo Hydra one-cylinder research engine, connected to a DC motor/dynamometer and to a microcomputer- based data acquisition system. Measurements of engine performance (spark advance, burning rate, and brake-specific fuel consumption) and brake-specific exhaust (hydrocarbon and nitrogen oxide) emissions were taken for both the base case and the new chamber. The new chamber had increased burning rates. For the covering abstract see IRRD 873243.

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Features: References;
  • Pagination: p. 25-9

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00713378
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Transport Research Laboratory
  • ISBN: 0-85298-847-8
  • Files: ITRD
  • Created Date: Nov 22 1995 12:00AM