CHANGES IN THE DIRECTION OF URBAN TRAVEL FOR THE CHICAGO AREA, 1970 TO 1990

There is considerable interest in reverse commuting but little understanding of what the term "reverse commuting" means. This study defines directional travel and reverse commuting and examines changes from 1970 to 1990. The household travel surveys of the Chicago Area Transportation Study are used to show that work trips are still very strongly oriented toward the central business district (CBD). Even though there have been increases in the number of workers commuting toward peripheral locations, the proportion commuting toward the CBD has remained fixed at 52% or has declined only slightly, depending upon how the CBD is defined. Work and shopping destinations illustrate an expected geographic pattern. Movement from the central county (Cook County) is more likely to be outbound than that which originates in peripherally located counties. Work trips show the strongest directional bias toward the CBD, whereas both recreational and shopping trips have a slightly greater tendency to be directed away from it. The study concludes that all modes of travel, except by suburban bus and school bus, illustrate a bias toward the CBD despite rapid population decentralization and an increasingly diffuse pattern of urban development. Further, these directional biases have changed little in 20 years, providing insights into the interaction between how a city grows and how the travel behavior of its populace changes.

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Features: Figures; References; Tables;
  • Pagination: p. 48-57
  • Monograph Title: Statewide travel surveys, traffic data collection, and urban travel patterns
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00713003
  • Record Type: Publication
  • ISBN: 0309061156
  • Files: TRIS, TRB
  • Created Date: Oct 12 1995 12:00AM