MANAGING MINNESOTA'S BRIDGES

The process that is presently used, and that is anticipated to be used in the future, to manage Minnesota's limited bridge resources is explained. Present bridge management history and policies including present inspection methods, computer tools that are available, present priority-ranking methods for bridge replacements, and the relationship between the Minnesota Department of Transportation (Mn/DOT) and local governments are discussed. Future bridge management practices including Pontis bridge management system (BMS) implementation, element-level inspections, the Minnesota case study in moving to the use of Pontis, new funding processes as a result of the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act (ISTEA), and how these factors will tie together for managing bridge resources in the 21st century are covered. In 1994 Minnesota began the process of implementing the Pontis BMS. Before that time all bridge inspections were based on National Bridge Inspection Standards and management decisions were guided by a Minnesota priority-ranking system, (FHWA) sufficiency ratings, Minnesota published improvement guidelines, and engineering judgment. Minnesota has used computer software programs extensively to record and store field inventory and inspection data, which has substantially reduced the amount of paperwork required during each inspection. With the advent of the Pontis BMS, inspection coding is changing and new data collection software has been developed. As a result of ISTEA, Minnesota has established area transportation partnerships that develop the statewide transportation improvement program. Outputs from BMS will provide information to be used in the selection of appropriate bridge projects and bridge maintenance activities. The outputs necessary to plan a bridge preservation and improvement program include overall conditions, estimates of bridge needs, future conditions assuming certain levels of expenditure, and identification of activities with high benefit-cost ratios. This information will best be illustrated through graphs or charts. Bridge management is another tool that can be used to assist in the definition of bridge programs, so even with the introduction of system analysis, engineering judgment will continue to be a part of the process. In the future integration will occur among the various management systems (pavement, safety, etc.). Limited integration exists at this time in Mn/DOT, and preliminary thoughts on extensive integration of these systems and level-of-service goals are described.

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Features: Figures; References; Tables;
  • Pagination: p. 3-15
  • Monograph Title: FOURTH INTERNATIONAL BRIDGE ENGINEERING CONFERENCE, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA, AUGUST 28-30, 1995. CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS, 2 VOLUMES
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00711667
  • Record Type: Publication
  • ISBN: 0309061091
  • Files: TRIS, TRB
  • Created Date: Sep 5 1995 12:00AM