EFFECT OF ROAD LAYOUT AND ROAD ENVIRONMENT ON DRIVING PERFORMANCE, DRIVERS' PHYSIOLOGY AND ROAD APPRECIATION

Infrastructural changes were implemented on rural 80km/h roads in The Netherlands in an effort to reduce speeding. The road infrastructure changes were designed to produce discomfort for the speeding driver by providing noxious auditory and haptic feedback. On experimental roads, smooth-surface road width was reduced by using blocks of gravel chippings placed along the centre line and at intervals on road edges. It was predicted that these changes would increase mental load while driving, and thereby decrease speeding. In a field experiment 28 subjects drove an instrumented vehicle over experimental and control roads. A decrease in driving speed and swerving behaviour was found on the experimental roads, and this was coupled with a decrease in heart rate variability, consistent with an increase in mental load. Roads in two different road-side environments (woodland vs. moorland) were also tested. There were differences in driver appraisal of the two environments, but no interactions were observed between these appraisals and driving performance on the experimental roads. It is concluded that the infrastructural measures have a useful role to play in road safety through a reduction in driver speeding. (A)

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  • Corporate Authors:

    Taylor & Francis

    4 Park Square, Milton Park
    Abingdon,   United Kingdom  OX14 4RN
  • Authors:
    • de Waard, D
    • JESSURUN, M
    • STEYVERS, RJJM
    • Raggatt, PTF
    • Brookhuis, K A
  • Publication Date: 1995-7

Language

  • English

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Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00711279
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Transport Research Laboratory
  • Files: ITRD
  • Created Date: Sep 20 1995 12:00AM