THE EFFECT OF SENSORY RESTRICTION UPON PERCEPTION OF DRIVING SPEEDS AT THIRTY MILES PER HOUR AND BELOW

Previous research into driving safety has indicated that drivers often cannot correctly judge speed. The present study was conducted to investigate the perception of speeds from 5-30 mph and to examine the role played by vision and audition in this perception. Twelve university students served as Ss by being passengers in a car under the conditions of normal, no sight, restricted hearing and no sight plus restricted hearing. Under each condition speed estimates were made at 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 mph. The results were analyzed using both algebraic and absolute error values which were expressed in terms of mph deviation as well as in terms of percentage inaccuracy. The no-sight condition was found to produce more error when algebraic values were used, these errors being overestimates of actual speeds. Higher speeds produced greater error when mph inaccuracy (both algebraic and absolute) was the measure and at lower speeds more inaccuracy in speed estimation was found in terms of percentage values of absolute error. The restriction of hearing alone or in addition to blindfolding of the Ss did not result in greater inaccuracy of speed estimation. The results are discussed in light of the findings of earlier studies.

  • Supplemental Notes:
    • Sponsored by the Canadian Ministry of Transport, Road and Motor Vehicle Traffic Safety Office, Canada.
  • Corporate Authors:

    Queen's University, Ontario

    Department of Civil Engineering
    Kingston, Ontario  Canada  K7L 3N6
  • Authors:
    • MacFeeters, L
    • WILDE, GJS
  • Publication Date: 1975-6

Media Info

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00132118
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Highway Safety Research Institute
  • Report/Paper Numbers: HS-019 212, HS-017 358
  • Files: HSL, TRIS
  • Created Date: Oct 29 1983 12:00AM