A PILOT STUDY OF THE USE OF A SIMULATOR IN RETRAINING PROBLEM DRIVERS

This pilot project was to determine if problem drivers could be trained to drive safely with operant conditioning techniques in three variations. Experimental design was an anlysis of variance with treatment as an independent variable of four levels, randomly accorded to problem drivers. These were control, training on the standard simulator, training on the modified simulator with feedback panel and/or a digit-tracker stressor. Subjects, 49, were at the point of receiving official action as a result of their driving record. Total number of class hours was 18 to 22. Five films with programmed instruction and immediate reinforcement were viewed four times. The standard simulator trained group had the fewest number of accidents and had no accidents for the first year subsequent to training. Psychological tests before and after the program showed no significant differences nor ecouraging treads. The simulator may have some potential for retraining problem drivers to avoid accidents, and this should be investigated further.

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  • Supplemental Notes:
    • Sponsored by the Public Health Service.
  • Corporate Authors:

    National Safety Council

    425 North Michigan Avenue
    Chicago, IL  USA  60611
  • Authors:
    • SCHUSTER, D H
  • Publication Date: 1975-9

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Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00131955
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: National Safety Council Safety Research Info Serv
  • Contract Numbers: 0020-01
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Jun 5 1976 12:00AM