THERMAL ACTIVITY OF BASE COURSE MATERIAL RELATED TO PAVEMENT CRACKING

An initial computer study using a heat transfer program showed that freeze-thaw activity during a winter, for Perryton, Texas, was centered mainly in the base course for a typical pavement. Comprehensive freeze-thaw testing showed the base course to be more active, thermally, than asphaltic concrete. The thermal activity is composed of a freeze deformation and a residual deformation. Both quantities are related to the soil moisture suction of the material. The soil moisture suction which develops in a sample is a function of the grain size, moisture, pore structure and clay mineralogy. Clay mineralogy determinations were done using x-ray diffraction to obtain the relative percentages of the clay minerals present. A direct relationship is established between the freeze deformation and clay mineralogy of the material tested. The data also demonstrate the validity of using clay mineralogy properties as a design quantity for base course material.

  • Supplemental Notes:
    • Prepared in cooperation with Texas State Dept. of Highways and Public Transportation, Austin.
  • Corporate Authors:

    Texas Transportation Institute

    Texas A&M University System, 1600 E Lamar Boulevard
    Arlington, TX  USA  76011

    Federal Highway Administration

    1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE
    Washington, DC  USA  20590

    Texas State Department of Highways & Public Transp

    P.O. Box 5051
    Austin, TX  USA  78763
  • Authors:
    • Carpenter, S H
    • Lytton, R L
  • Publication Date: 1975-12

Media Info

  • Pagination: 128 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00137323
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: National Technical Information Service
  • Report/Paper Numbers: TTI-2-8-73-18-2 Res. Rpt., FHWA/RD-S0478
  • Files: TRIS, USDOT, STATEDOT
  • Created Date: Sep 16 1977 12:00AM