HIGHWAY SAFETY EFFECTS OF THE ENERGY CRISIS ON U.S. TOLL ROADS

The study examines highway safety effects as related to the energy crisis on selected toll roads in the United States. Data concerning accidents, traffic volumes, and speeds of travel--broken down by vehicle class into passenger cars and large trucks--are analyzed. Passenger car traffic was reduced about 15% and average speeds by about 8 miles per hour as a result of the energy crisis. The speeds of large trucks were reduced about 4 miles per hour, but truck traffic did not change appreciably. Accident rates overall were reduced much more than could be accounted for by travel alone. Accident severity was apparently reduced leading to 47% reduction in fatalities. Large trucks were over-represented in the two-vehicle accident population.

  • Corporate Authors:

    Highway Safety Research Institute

    Huron Parkway and Baxter Road
    Ann Arbor, MI  USA  48109

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

    1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE
    Washington, DC  USA  20590
  • Authors:
    • Campbell, K
    • SCOTT, R
    • Tolkin, S
  • Publication Date: 1976-6

Media Info

  • Pagination: 152 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00137316
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: National Technical Information Service
  • Report/Paper Numbers: UM-HSRI-76-5 Final Rpt., DOT-HS-801-933
  • Contract Numbers: DOT-HS-4-00980
  • Files: TRIS, USDOT
  • Created Date: Sep 16 1977 12:00AM