AN ANALYSIS OF DRIVERS MOST RESPONSIBLE FOR FATAL ACCIDENTS VERSUS A CONTROL SAMPLE

An experimental driver sample consisting of 267 motor vehicle operators judged to have been 'most responsible' for a highway fatality in the greater Boston area was investigated. Also, a matched control sample of 801 operators never responsible for a fatal highway accident was collected. The experimental sample was evaluated from two differing perspectives: accident typology and alcohol involvement. The typology results showed 103 (38%) TYPE I accidents where the operator was killed; 63 (24%) TYPE II accidents where the operator survived the crash which resulted in the death of another vehicular occupant; and, 101 (38%) TYPE III accidents where the operator struck and killed a pedestrian. Samples were also analyzed to establish pre-identification and predictive variables to identify operators who might be potential candidates for a fatal highway accident. The variables most significant in the discriminant function analysis included: previous arrests for DWI and speeding, alcohol use patterns, levels of education and occupation. The results detailed a Boston Predictive Formula for identifying potentially high risk operators from the general population.

Media Info

  • Pagination: 177 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00137041
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: National Technical Information Service
  • Report/Paper Numbers: Pt. 2 Final Rpt., DOT-HS-801-916
  • Contract Numbers: DOT-HS-310-3-595
  • Files: NTIS, NTL, TRIS, USDOT
  • Created Date: Aug 23 1976 12:00AM