AN INVESTIGATION TO DETERMINE WHETHER THE DAYTIME USAGE OF MOTORCYCLE HEADLIGHTS AND TAILLIGHTS SHOULD BE MADE COMPULSORY IN WESTERN AUSTRALIA

A review of overseas and Australian literature indicated that lack of daytime visibility of motorcyclists to other road users could be a contributing factor, of some importance, to the occurrence of motorcycle accidents. Compulsory daytime headlight and taillight usage by motorcyclists was found to reduce motorcycle accidents in four American states by 4.4%. An analysis of the various driving errors which led to motorcycle accidents in western Australia during 1973 indicated that a similar, or possibly an even greater reduction could be expected in this state. Various alternative methods for increasing daytime motorcycle visibility were considered, but found to be inferior to that proposed in the paper. Two surveys were made of the incidence of voluntary daytime motorcycle headlight usage in the Perth metropolitan area. It was found that only 43% of the motorcyclists observed in the first survey, and 35% in the second survey, had their headlights "on". The investigation concluded by strongly recommending that the compulsory daytime usage of motorcycle and motorscooter headlights (on low beam) and taillights should be introduced at an early date. (A) /TRRL/

  • Corporate Authors:

    Western Australia Road Traffic Authority

    22 Mount Street
    Perth, Western Australia,   Australia 
  • Authors:
    • Smith, D I
  • Publication Date: 1975-7

Media Info

  • Features: References; Tables;
  • Pagination: 31 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00134386
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Transport and Road Research Laboratory (TRRL)
  • Files: ITRD, TRIS, ATRI
  • Created Date: Dec 15 1976 12:00AM