IMPEDIMENTS TO THE EVALUATION OF HIGHWAY

In the U.S., the death rate per 100 million vehicle miles has dropped three-fold in 40 years--from 15.60 in 1933 to 4.30 in 1973. Although this decline has been attributed to numerous and varied regulations, programs, and countermeasures, the real reasons for the decrease are unknown. In order that realistic decisions regarding the continuation, addition, or deletion of highway safety programs be made in the future, it is imperative that valid evaluations be conducted. Without such evaluations, the effectiveness of highway safety programs cannot be determined. If this determination is not made, limited available funds cannot be allocated to those programs which are most effective in saving lives and reducing injuries and property damage. Although the evaluation process has been criticized on numerous grounds, real "effectiveness" evaluations have rarely been carried out. The most frequent and crucial impediments in the area of highway safety evaluation are seen to be: (1) a lack of understanding of evaluation; (2) an unwillingness to have programs undergo evaluation if an understanding of the process does exist; (3) a paucity of trained personnel to carry out evaluations; and (4) the existence of inadequate tools, procedures, and data bases for establishing sound evaluative research procedures. Recommendations are made detailing ways in which these deficiencies might be overcome and future highway safety evaluation improved.

  • Corporate Authors:

    University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

    Highway Safety Research Center
    Chapel Hill, NC  USA  27599
  • Authors:
    • Griffin III, L I
    • Powers, B
    • MULLEN, C
  • Publication Date: 1975-6

Media Info

  • Features: References; Tables;
  • Pagination: 75 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00133532
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Highway Safety Research Institute
  • Report/Paper Numbers: UNC 7404-C5.1
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Aug 23 1976 12:00AM