WHY ARE THE "SAFEST" NORMS, ATTITUDES AND TYPES OF BEHAVIOUR NOT TYPICAL FOR THE SAFEST DRIVERS?

This paper presents a driver motivation theory. This theory assumes that: (1) drivers generally try to maintain a speed they enjoy; and (2) that they accordingly try to avoid obstacles that force them to choose another (lower) speed. The main argument presented is that drivers who enjoy a somewhat faster speed than the average driver, will relatively more often be obstructed by other road users. Accordingly, these drivers will be more concerned with predicting other road users' behaviour than the average driver. This preoccupation with predicting other road users' behaviour is primarily motivated by these drivers' goal of maintaining a desired speed. However, it is argued that the information they obtain in order to reach their goal has safety as a by-product. The theory is tested using survey data onboth driver behaviour and self reported accidents. For the covering abstract of the conference see IRRD 867839.

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Features: References;
  • Pagination: p. 247-57

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00675839
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Institute for Road Safety Research, SWOV
  • Files: ITRD
  • Created Date: Apr 12 1995 12:00AM