IS DRIVING AN AUTOMATIC TASK? DUAL-TASK PERFORMANCE AND HAZARD PERCEPTION

The authors consider the issue of dual tasks in driving and describe an experiment to examine the effects of dual tasks on hazard perception in particular. A task was developed analogous to using a telephone whilst driving. Drivers had to listen to a continuous sequence of speech and to make appropriate responses. Peripheral competition was avoided by the hazard perception test involving visual input and manual output and the secondary task involving auditory input and vocal output. The procedure, which involved 80 drivers with less than 3 years driving experience, is outlined. The results described for overall hazard perception show an interference in the performance of the primary task. It is concluded that responding to hazards is not automatic. The performance of more experienced driver groups is considered. For the covering abstract see IRRD 867359.

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Features: References;
  • Pagination: p. 19-23

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00675022
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Transport Research Laboratory
  • Files: ITRD
  • Created Date: Mar 28 1995 12:00AM