TRANSPORTATION-RELATED AIR QUALITY AND ECONOMIC GROWTH IN AMERICAN CITIES, 1981 TO 1991

Can urban area economic growth be maintained while reducing transportation-related air pollution? To answer this question trends in transportation-related air pollution, employment, traffic, and population were traced for 98 nonattainment U.S. cities over the period 1981 to 1991. Data on 18 measures of pollution (ozone and carbon monoxide), three measures of traffic (vehicle miles traveled and roadway miles), five measures of economic activity (employment), and five measures of climatological circumstances are analyzed. Cities were ranked in order of progress on reducing air pollution while holding down traffic growth and encouraging economic activity. Simple repeated-measures analysis of variance models were used to analyze the data. Results show that (a) spurred by federal emissions standards, U.S. transportation-related air pollution declined 85% for carbon monoxide (CO) and 35% for ozone from 1981 to 1991, whereas employment increased 25% and traffic increased 52%; (b) progress in CO reduction was unrelated to city size, employment growth, or traffic growth, being caused primarily by improvements in automotive technology; and (c) generally cities with the most rapid population, traffic, and employment growth showed the greatest reductions in ozone. It is suggested that economic growth is compatible with progress toward cleaner air.

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Features: Figures; References; Tables;
  • Pagination: p. 99-108
  • Monograph Title: Transportation environmental issues: air, noise, water, mitigation processes, and alternative fuels
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00674206
  • Record Type: Publication
  • ISBN: 0309060508
  • Files: TRIS, TRB, ATRI
  • Created Date: Jan 31 1995 12:00AM