QUALITY OF PUBLIC TRANSPORT: A SURVEY OF BRITISH RAIL, LONDON UNDERGROUND AND DOCKLANDS LIGHT RAILWAY STATIONS IN LONDON

The London Research Centre has conducted a survey into the quality of public transport in London. Quality has traditionally been defined by the providers of public transport and has been lacking in its focus by reflecting more the concerns of the operators than those of the users. The survey was carried out on a sample of 123 British Rail, London Underground and Docklands Light Railway stations (approximately over a quarter of all stations within the six travel card zones of London). The survey covered quality issues including: accessibility of stations for physically handicapped users; availability and condition of public toilets; availability of public telephones; availability of timetables and network maps; graffiti; lighting; litter; train announcements on approach of train; and visual indicators of destination/route of next train. The fieldwork for the survey was conducted over five and a half weeks during July and August 1992. The initial results are giving a precise picture of neglect, shabbiness and a disregard to the quality of the travelling environment on London's rail system. The paper focuses on the issues that affect the disabled and those with limited or constrained mobility. British Rail performs less well than London Transport. The Docklands Light Railway has the poorest level of quality on all of London's rail system. The study discusses the results with the implications they have for the impending privatisation of British Rail. (A) For the covering abstract see IRRD 866258.

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Features: References;
  • Pagination: p. 1-12

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00668666
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Transport Research Laboratory
  • ISBN: 0-86050-259-7
  • Files: ITRD, ATRI
  • Created Date: Nov 16 1994 12:00AM