AN INQUIRY INTO THE FEASIBILITY OF USING OCEAN SURFACE WAVE ENERGY TO POWER AN OCEANOGRAPHIC DATA COLLECTION BUOY

A brief history of attempts to use ocean surface wave energy is presented and applicable wave theory is reviewed. Six distinct modes of interaction between a wave and a buoy are defined. These are evaluated by deriving expressions for the maximum power realizable from each and by considering how the use of each would affect buoy functioning. Those modes involving the buoy's reaction to the rise and fall of the ocean surface and the use of the fluctuating pressure field beneath a wave train are selected for further study. A buoy motion analysis supplemented by limited experimentation into linear damping coefficients is presented in connection with the first of these. Conceptual-level conversion system designs are proposed and compared with other power systems adaptable to buoy use in terms of their energy densities and specific costs and by subjective consideration of their adaptability to long-term unattended use in the ocean.

  • Supplemental Notes:
    • Sponsored in part by Coast Guard, Washington, D.C. Office of Personnel. Master's thesis.
  • Corporate Authors:

    University of Rhode Island, Kingston

    Department of Ocean Engineering, 227 Water Hall
    Kingston, RI  USA  02881

    Coast Guard

    Office of Personnel
    Washington, DC  USA 
  • Authors:
    • Becker, W W
  • Publication Date: 1969-1

Media Info

  • Pagination: 120 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00133026
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: National Technical Information Service
  • Files: NTIS
  • Created Date: Jun 23 2002 12:00AM