VEHICLE-BASED DROWSY DRIVER DETECTION: CURRENT STATUS AND FUTURE PROSPECTS

Driver drowsiness is a major, though elusive, cause of traffic crashes. As part of its IVHS/human factors program, The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) is supporting research to develop in-vehicle systems to continuously monitor driver alertness and performance. Scientific support for the feasibility of this countermeasure concept is provided by research showing that: Drowsy drivers typically do not "drop off" instantaneously. Drowsiness can be detected with reasonable accuracy by monitoring driving performance measures such as "drift-and-jerk" steering and fluctuations in vehicle lateral lane position. The use of direct, unobtrusive driver psychophysiological monitoring (e.g., eye closure) could enhance drowsiness detection significantly. The use of secondary/subsidiary auditory tasks (e.g., auditory recognition tasks presented to the driver via recorded voice) could further enhance detection accuracy.

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Features: Figures; References; Tables;
  • Pagination: p. 245-256
  • Monograph Title: MOVING TOWARD DEPLOYMENT. PROCEEDINGS OF THE 1994 ANNUAL MEETING OF IVHS AMERICA

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00667853
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Report/Paper Numbers: Volume 1
  • Files: NTL, TRIS
  • Created Date: Oct 13 1994 12:00AM