1992 OBSERVATIONAL AND TELEPHONE SURVEY OF RESTRAINT USE BY CHILDREN IN MOTOR VEHICLES

The purpose of this study was to determine the extent of inadequate restraint of child occupants in motor vehicles, to identify types and frequencies of errors, and to identify predictors of and reasons for misuse of child restraint systems. The study, conducted in 26 locations in the province of Ontario, comprised an observational and a telephone survey. Overall, the results indicated a relatively high level of nonuse of restraints and an unacceptably high level of misuse of infant seats and child seats. The evidence suggests that the results have underestimated the actual non-use and misuse problems. The study estimates that at least one-third of Canadian children are unrestrained while riding in motor vehicles. Univariate and multivariate statistical analyses indicated that the following variables were associated with children being rstrained: a belted driver, a female driver, fewer passengers, new vehicles, consistent use of restraints for children in a variety of situations, and an appreciation of the risks associated with motor vehicle accidents. While the study was able to distinguish between restraint use and non-use, it was not able to distinguish among misuse levels. Eight recommendations for further action and research are presented. (A)

  • Corporate Authors:

    Transport Canada

    Road Safety and Motor Vehicle Regulation Directorate, 330 Sparks Street
    Ottawa, Ontario  Canada  K1A 0N5
  • Authors:
    • Wilson, R J
    • Grant, B
    • HURLEY, J
  • Publication Date: 1994-3

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Features: References;
  • Pagination: 106 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00674532
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Transportation Association of Canada (TAC)
  • Files: ITRD
  • Created Date: Mar 8 1995 12:00AM