SLABJACKING CONCRETE PAVEMENTS. NEW PRODUCT EVALUATION. FINAL REPORT

Slabjacking is promoted as a long-term Portland Cement Concrete (PCC) pavement rehabilitation technique on the premise a pavement's poor foundation is strengthened and stabilized by first mechanically jacking the slab, then pumping a cementitious grout into the space created underneath the suspended slab. In August, 1991, 27 consecutive jointed concrete pavement slabs were jacked and for comparison 21 were ground on USH 10, Waupaca County. Joint spacing ranged from 10 feet to 28 feet in both the 500-foot jacked section and 400-foot ground section. Fault readings taken between slabs remain virtually unchanged, since 1991, in both sections of USH 10. However, multiple stress cracks appeared within a few months of construction in about half of the jacked slabs. Crack severity between the resulting broken concrete pieces has since worsened. Slabjacking is not recommended as a PCC pavement rehabilitation technique for the following reasons. Slabjacking was about three times more expensive than grinding. Structural distress is greater and the ride is poorer in the slabjacked section. Lastly, motorists were inconvenienced by having to be rerouted around the jacked slabs for three days following construction to allow the grout to set.

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Features: Figures; Photos; Tables;
  • Pagination: 16 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00670495
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Report/Paper Numbers: WI-01-94, Study ME 91-D01
  • Files: TRIS, STATEDOT
  • Created Date: Dec 28 1994 12:00AM