OUT-OF-TOWN SHOPPING: IS IT NOW TOO LATE FOR PLANNERS TO CHANGE CONSUMERS' HABITS?

This article discusses the current controversy about out-of-town shopping centres in the UK and their future prospects. The Department of the Environment (DoE) has strongly signalled its intention to resist new out-of-town shopping developments, in order to: (1) increase sustainability; (2) reduce vehicle emissions; and (3) protect the vitality of urban centres. Supermarket managements argue that consumers' use of cars to visit existing out-of-town superstores has become so well-established that it may already be too late to reverse. There is more argument about whether the point of no return has been reached for regional shopping malls and retail warehouse parks. Following its planning policy guidance notes PPG6 on retail development and PPG13 (draft) on transport, the DoE is more willing to use land use planning as a tool to reduce travel needs. It has recently refused planning applications for two out-of-town shopping centres. However, a study of Swindon for Sainsbury's by the Oxford University Transport Studies Unit suggested that the opening of two large stores there had actually reduced distances travelled for food shopping. Sainsbury's claims that carefully planned, accessible out- of-centre sites can help to reduce vehicle emissions.

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    LOCAL TRANSPORT TODAY

    QUADRANT HOUSE, 250 KENNINGTON LANE
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  • Authors:
    • STRINGER, B
  • Publication Date: 1994-2-17

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Features: References;
  • Pagination: p. 12-3
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00665377
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Transport Research Laboratory
  • Files: ITRD
  • Created Date: Sep 9 1994 12:00AM