THE EFFECT OF BEVERAGE ALCOHOL ON PERCEIVED RISK UNDER REALISTIC AND SIMULATED TRAFFIC CONDITIONS

The effect of moderate blood-alcohol levels (80 mg/100 ml) on risk prception was examined in a naturalistic driving context and a movie simulation. Twelve subjects in their early twenties were tested under sober, alcohol and placebo conditions. A ten-point subjective scale was used to measure risk estimation. During driving conditions the subject rated from the front passenger's seat. A standard for comparison was provided by having the vehicle operator rate on a similar scale and using concordance between the two ratings as the dependent measure. No significant changes in risk perception were found between pharmacological conditions. However, the naturalistic and simulated settings yielded significantly different concordance levels, concordance being higher under actual driving conditions. Conclusions were drawn regarding the validity of the two settings for studying risk-related driving behavior. It was suggested that personality factors may interact with alcohol in the production of dangerous driving behavior in some and not in others./Author/

  • Corporate Authors:

    Ministry of Transport, Canada

    Tower C, Place de Ville
    Ottawa, ONo K1A 0N5,   Canada 
  • Authors:
    • Browning, J J
    • Wilde, G J
  • Publication Date: 1975-6

Media Info

  • Features: Figures; References; Tables;
  • Pagination: 48 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00131837
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: National Safety Council Safety Research Info Serv
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Sep 4 1976 12:00AM