AT WHAT BLOOD ALCOHOL CONCENTRATION SHOULD DRINK-DRIVING BE ILLEGAL?

This article discusses the evidence for supporting a change in the legal drink drive limit from 17.4 mmol/L to 10.9 mmol/L. Results from the Grand Rapids case control study, the Medical Research Council's research on simulated driving, and data from case studies from the United States and Australia all indicate that a figure lower than 17.4 mmol/L is necessary if crashes are to be avoided. Behavioural studies also suggest that driving related skills are significantly impaired at blood alcohol concentration below 10.9 mmol/L. The effect of reducing the limit from 17.4 mmol/L to 10.9 mmol/L upon the proportion of drivers with blood alcohol concentrations above 17.4 mmol/L and upon accident rate is also discussed briefly.

  • Availability:
  • Corporate Authors:

    British Medical Association

    BMA House, Tavistock Square
    London WC1H 9JR,   United Kingdom 
  • Authors:
    • GUPPY, A
  • Publication Date: 1994

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Features: References;
  • Pagination: p. 1055-6
  • Serial:
    • BMJ
    • Volume: 308
    • Issue Number: 6936
    • Publisher: British Medical Association
    • ISSN: 0959-8138
    • Serial URL: http://www.bmj.com/

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00662552
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Transport Research Laboratory
  • Files: ITRD
  • Created Date: Jul 28 1994 12:00AM