ACCIDENTS GET NEW VALUES, BUT HOW MUCH IS ROAD SAFETY WORTH?

The Department of Transport has now adopted greatly increased estimates of the cost of non-fatal accidents. Serious casualties are now valued fourteen times higher than the previous value. These figures alter the balance in favour of safety away from time savings in cost-benefit analysis of road schemes. Recent research has shown that the willingness to pay for safety approach produced estimates that were consistent for fatal and non-fatal accidents. These estimates of human costs are added to resource costs, including lost input to the economy and direct medical costs, which are now a much smaller part of total accident costs. The accuracy of police records, which are based on forms filled in at the scene, has been investigated by comparison with hospital records. Police records can then be recalibrated to take account of unreported or misreported accidents. Urban accident prevention, where fewer accidents are fatal could be favoured by the new values. There is some concern that the cost- benefit justification for more safer road schemes could be used to justify improvements which would increase demand making traffic heavier and safety worse.

  • Availability:
  • Corporate Authors:

    LOCAL TRANSPORT TODAY

    QUADRANT HOUSE, 250 KENNINGTON LANE
    LONDON,   United Kingdom  SE11 5RD
  • Publication Date: 1993-9-30

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Features: References;
  • Pagination: p. 11
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00662377
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Transport Research Laboratory
  • Files: ITRD
  • Created Date: Jul 28 1994 12:00AM